Fulfillment Associate

What a weird job title

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The latest trend in tea is a whipped topping made of cheese

Yeah.

Iced, hot, sweetened or with milk, it seems like there’s plenty of options for tea drinkers already. But one trendy addition to the menu is stirring things up.

Cheese tea is the latest beverage trend overflowing on social media news feeds. The drink, which originated in Taiwan and spread throughout Asia, has become the latest popular beverage at bubble tea shops.

While cheese and tea may not sound like an obvious pairing, people on social media are hailing the concoction and drinking it up, sharing their experiences with #CheeseTea.

PHOTO: Cheese tea, like this version served in Penang, Malaysia, is a popular cold tea beverage topped with a tangy and creamy whipped cheese foam.

nviesion/Instagram Cheese tea, like this version served in Penang, Malaysia, is a popular cold tea beverage topped with a tangy and creamy whipped cheese foam.

NORKs be starving to death, but at least they’re getting photo beauty apps for their smart phones

LOL!
 

A new mobile phone app developed in North Korea allows its users to experiment with new looks.

While such photo manipulation apps are common around the world, it appears that Bomhyanggi 1.0 (Spring Scent) is the first of its kind for smartphone users in the Communist country.

 
Now they can know what they’ll look like with a state-approved hairstyle.

Oh, wait; they already do…

Greetings from Saufend-on-Sji, in Polish-occupied England

What, er, might have been? (Not bloody likely, but still…)

This is England. But not as we know it. Imagine an alternative past, in which the Warsaw Pact successfully invaded Great Britain.

A Polish occupying force is trying to make sense of this strange land, and the strange names of its cities and towns. How would a Polish soldier have asked a local for directions? Not by trying to read Southend-on-Sea off a map. That name trips off a Warsaw tongue much easier in Polish phonetic spelling: Saufend-on-Sji.

This map was produced by and for the army of communist Poland, in our past – the real one – for the aftermath of a military victory that never materialised.

If the time had ever come for the Polish Army to police this corner of England, a map like this would have been handy, rendering the names of the main towns and cities of the area in a phonetic spelling that makes Polish sense out of English topography. Some other examples:

  • Dzylynem is Gillingham

  • Roczyste is Rochester

  • Mejdsten is Maidstone

  • Tanbrydz-Łelz is Tunbridge Wells

  • Hejstynz is Hastings

  • Istbon is Eastbourne

  • Koulczyste is Colchester

  • Byszeps-Stofed is Bishops Storford

  • Apmynste is Upminster

  • and of course, Landen is London.