Vodka recalled for being double strength

Oops!

TORONTO — An Ontario-made brand of vodka is being pulled from store shelves in the province because of a faulty batch that contained double the alcohol content shown on the label. Christine Bujold of the Liquor Control Board of Ontario says one batch of Georgian Bay brand vodka was not properly diluted prior to bottling. She says the 654 bottles in batch 19 are labelled as containing 40 per cent alcohol by volume, but says the contents are actually 81 per cent alcohol. As a precaution, Bujold says the LCBO is pulling all bottles of Georgian Bay vodka. She says the dilution error is confined to one batch, adding the Toronto-based Georgian Bay Gin Company that produces the spirits is co-operating with the recall. She says an 81 per cent alcohol level is not safe for consumption and could cause illness, particularly if consumed under the assumption that the alcohol content was lower. “There are beverage alcohols out there that are that potent, however they’re labelled accordingly,” Bujold said. “With the vodka, the label says it’s 40 per cent, you might be drinking it neat without dilution. What you’re actually consuming is 80 per cent, so that’s where the risk is.”

I wouldn’t return the bottle and get a refund, if I had one; I’d pour half into an empty bottle of the same size, dilute both with Brita-filtered tapwater or bottled water, up to the top, then you have two bottles of 40% alcohol vodka for the price of one. Win-win! 🙂

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Are you a Buffalo, NY college / university student and drinker who likes to do Red Bull + vodka shots, Jägerbombs, or Four Loko? Here’s an opportunity to make a little spending money for your habits!

From some Buffalo, NY 'zine.

From some Buffalo, NY ‘zine.

Kenya: Please don’t give baboons booze

But they’re such great drinking buddies! 🙂

Travellers along one of Kenya’s busiest highways have been warned not to give alcohol to baboons, it is reported.

The Kenya Wildlife Service says it is “irresponsible and careless” to offer intoxicating drinks to the primates, The Nation newspaper reports. “Liquor has the same effect in animals as on human beings,” says the service’s director, William Kibet Kiprono. “They might become violent, or distract road users, causing accidents. They might also start fighting people and cause death if unchecked.”

He was speaking in Naivasha, a town on a motorway linking the city of Nakuru with Kenya’s capital, Nairobi. The area is sandwiched between several nature reserves, where wildlife abounds. It is not clear how common it is for people to give alcohol to monkeys, but up to 7,000 baboons are believed to live outside nature reserves. Kenya’s NTV television says the busy highway is “under siege by groups of marauding baboons”.

Meanwhile, locals have been complaining about the nuisance tipsy animals are causing. “They eat our goats, and we have been unable to plant food for the last three years,” one farmer tells The Nation. Another villager adds: “We chase 20 monkeys every night. They enter our kitchens and steal food.”