‘Ancient aliens’ built world’s first airport 7,000 years ago – Iraqi Minister

And travellers had to check-in hours ahead of their flights, just like now! (j/k) 😉

Iraq’s Transport Minister, Kazem Finjan, claims “ancient aliens” built earth’s first airport 7,000 years ago in the Middle East – and used it for interplanetary missions.

Getting ever so slightly sidetracked during a press conference to announce the construction of a real-life, modern day airport in Dhi Qar, southern Iraq, Finjan suggested spacecraft launched from the same area in 5,000 BC discovered Pluto and the mythical planet of Nibiru.

Sumerians inhabited what was Mesopotamia and, according to Finjan, were aided in developing this space station by visiting aliens.

“The first airport that was established on planet earth was in this place. It was constructed 5,000 years before Christ,” Finjan told a baffled gallery of journalists.

“The particularity of this place is that it remains the safest for the landing and takeoff of aircraft, due to favourable weather conditions. When the Sumerians settled on this land, they were aware of this and have chosen specifically for their flights to other planets.”

Who knew? 🙂

Red romaine lettuce grown in space tastes like arugula, astronauts say

Great!

It was one small bite for man, one giant meal for mankind.

On a gustatory adventure never attempted by humanity, astronauts have for the first time dined on a harvest sown in space. The verdict from astronaut Scott Kelly: “Tastes good. Kinda like arugula.” It was a strangely appropriate comment, given that arugula is also known as rocket.

🙂

Norway to rent Dutch prisons to cut convict queue

Crazy.

(Reuters) – Norway plans to rent prison space in the Netherlands as the queue of convicts awaiting cells is growing and renovation work at Norwegian jails is expected to cut capacity, the justice ministry said on Monday.

“At the moment, the queue is at 1,300 custodial sentences, and there is a great demand for detention space,” it said in a statement. “The Netherlands has already leased prison capacity to Belgium for several years.”

Norwegian prisons are known for their relatively humane treatment of inmates, with non-violent offenders often held in open prisons with some free personal movement, jobs, recreation facilities and focus on rehabilitation.

A deal for several hundred prison places would allow Norway to avoid overcrowding and maintain its standards while prison renovation work costing up to 4.4 billion crowns ($700 million) is carried out.

The Nordic country’s incarceration rate is around 72 for each 100,000 people, about a tenth of the level in the United States, and its re-offending rate of around 20 percent is among the lowest in the world.

“In Norway there is a capacity shortage, and right now we have a surplus,” Fred Teeven, the Dutch state secretary with responsibility for prisons, said in a letter to the Dutch parliament.

Whiskey Matured in Outer Space Is One Small Step for Man But One Giant Leap for Liquor

Will S.' Sunny Side Blog

Space whisky!

The Ardbeg Distillery is getting ready to test a drink that’s literally out of this world – the first whiskey to have ever been matured in outer space. After spending three years on the International Space Station, the vial of single malt is finally returning to Earth. It is expected to land on solid ground in Kazakhstan on September 12, before making its way to Houston.

The project is part of an experiment to study the impact of gravity on how alcohol matures. The whisky was launched into outer space in an unmanned cargo spacecraft in October 2011, along with particles of charred oak. The vial containing the alcoholic drink was specially designed for the mission, and has been orbiting the earth 15 times a day for 1,045 days, on the ISS.

When the vial returns, the alcohol won’t be consumed right away. It has to be tested…

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Sex geckos die in orbit on Russian space project

I hate when that happens!

Five gecko lizards sent into orbit on a Russian space satellite as part of a sex experiment have all died, the Russian space agency says.

The Foton-M4 satellite returned to Earth on Monday, the Roscosmos agency said in a statement (in Russian).

Experts say the geckos may have frozen to death after the heating system broke down, Russian news agencies report.

They were sent into space as part of a study into the effect of weightlessness on their sex lives and development.

“We can say with confidence that they died at least a week before the landing because their bodies were partly mummified,” an official from Russia’s Institute of Medical and Biological Problems told Itar-Tass news agency.