Three academics argue that boys have an unfair advantage over girls in understanding physics and thus out-performing girls in tests, because they can urinate standing up

Right

A trio of researchers—two in Australia, one in Scotland—have suggested a delightful explanation for the unfortunate and embarrassing fact that boys outperform girls on physics tests.

It’s because boys pee standing up.

In an allegedly scholarly paper called “Taking the pee out of physics: how boys are getting a leg-up,” Anna Wilson, Kate Wilson, and David Low say they realize that some people will think they’re “daft,” but they insist that their intentions are “honourable.” They say that “playful urination practices” such as Peeball or even spelling their names in the snow with their pee “may give boys an advantage over girls when it comes to physics”:

The fact that boys (and men) play with their ability to projectile pee is hardly contentious.…All this is experienced up to five times a day, so by 14, boys have had the opportunity to play with projectile motion around 10,000 times. And 14 is when many children meet formalised physics in the form of projectile motion and Newton’s equations of motion for the first time.

But as we all know, their statements—and by extension, all “academic” papers of this ilk—are worthless once you take the piss out of them.

Daft, indeed…

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People with full bladders make better liars, new research shows

Yeah.

There is a connection between humans’ ability to tell a lie and their urgent need to urinate, a recent study by US researchers has shown, claiming that those who have to control the bladder perform a deception task better.

Liars can successfully use covert self-control strategies to facilitate deception,” the research which is to be published in the December volume of Consciousness and Cognition Journal, has shown.

To conduct the study which was supported by the California State University, a number of students were asked to first complete a questionnaire on several controversial issues, and then were asked to drink different amounts of water – 700 ml (requiring high-control of the bladder) and 50 ml (low-control) – having been told it was an unrelated task.

Forty-five minutes later the students were asked to do interviews with a panel – instructed to lie about their opinions on the issues that mattered most to them. Third-party observers were assessing the presence of behavioral cues while the respondents lied or told the truth to an interviewer.

In the high-control, but not the low-control condition, liars displayed significantly fewer behavioral cues to deception, more behavioral cues signaling truth, and provided longer and more complex accounts than truth-tellers,” the research showed, adding that it was much more difficult to detect a liar in a person who has drank a lot of water and urgently needed to go to a toilet. “Observers revealed bias toward perceiving [such] liars as truth-tellers,” the study said.

So there you are. If you need to lie, drink plenty of fluids first. 😉

German city uses water-repellent paint to splash public urinators with their own pee

Their tax-euros at work…

pissrepellant

That’s ‘hydrophobic’, not ‘hyrophobic’, you tax-funded crown corp journo morons evidently not possessing a spellchecker…

Some aren’t fans of the initiative, however, saying that a better solution would be to install more public toilets instead of using an expensive substance to combat the problem (for the record, it costs about €500 — or $684 CAD — to cover a six-square metre area with hydrophobic paint.)

Indeed!

Others point out that public urinators could simply “pee diagonally” to avoid any splash-back.

Just like playing pool, or optics: angle of incidence = angle of reflection. 😉

D’Oh!

University of East Anglia students urged to urinate in shower

Save the environment, yada yada…

University students are being urged to urinate in the shower in a bid to save water.

The Go with the Flow campaign is the brainchild of students Debs Torr and Chris Dobson, from the University of East Anglia (UEA) in Norwich.

They want the university’s 15,000 students to take their first wee of the day while having their morning shower.

Mr Dobson, 20, said the idea could “save enough water to fill an Olympic-sized swimming pool 26 times”.

The pair want those taking part to pledge their allegiance on Facebook and Twitter and have offered gift vouchers to the first people to join the challenge.

It’s okay to pee in the ocean, says the American Chemical Society

Good to know. 🙂

When you’re enjoying the water on a hot summer day and realize you have to go, do you need to swim all the way back to the bathroom? Or can you just pee in the ocean?

Go ahead and pee, says a new video from the American Chemical Society, an association of professional chemists and chemical engineers. The video points out that urine is almost entirely made of water, sodium and chloride, which are already found in large quantities in the ocean. Pee does contain a tiny bit of the waste product urea, but the amount is minuscule compared to the 350 quintillion litres of water in the Atlantic Ocean alone.

Besides, the video suggests, the urea may be good for the environment: “Urea contains a lot of nitrogen. Nitrogen combines with water to produce ammonium which feeds ocean plant life.”

Why Californians Will Soon Be Drinking Their Own Pee

Because they really liked Kevin Costner’s ‘Waterworld’. (j/k) 😉

OAKLAND, Calif.—California has a lot of coastline. So why all the fuss about the drought? Desalination to the rescue, right?

Not quite. The largest desalination plant in the Western Hemisphere is currently under construction in Carlsbad in San Diego County at great expense. The price tag: $1 billion.

Right now, San Diego is almost totally dependent on imported water from Sierra snowmelt and the Colorado River. When the desalination plant comes online in 2016, it will produce 50 million gallons per day, enough to offset just 7 percent of the county’s water usage. That’s a huge bill for not very much additional water.

[…]

Which brings us to the pee-drinking.

This year’s drought has motivated California to invest $1 billion in new money on water recycling efforts statewide, a much more cost-efficient way of increasing potable water supplies. But reusing purified sewer water for brushing your teeth is not without its own set of issues. National Journal describes the biggest holdup:

The problem with recycled water is purely psychological. Despite the fact the water is safe and sterile, the “yuck factor” is hard to get over, even if a person understands that the water poses no harm. In one often-cited experiment, researchers poured clean apple juice into a clean bedpan, and asked participants if they’d be comfortable drinking the apple juice afterwards. Very few of the participants agreed, even though there was nothing wrong with it. It’s forever associated with being “dirty,” just like recycled wastewater.

While it’s not quite correct that every glass of water contains dinosaur pee, it is true that every source of fresh water on Earth (rainfall, lakes, rivers, and aquifers) is part of a planetary-scale water cycle that passes through every living thing at one point or another. In a very real way, each and every day we are already drinking one another’s urine.

Bottom’s up!
http://www.anyclip.com/movies/waterworld/drinking-recycled-piss/
http://www.dailymotion.com/video/xkye69_drinking-recycled-piss-part-2_shortfilms